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The Glossary page consists of several terms and definitions that one might encounter when dealing with a pneumothorax. If you would like to add to our list,
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Xrefer contains encyclopedias, dictionaries, thesauri & books of quotations from the world's leading publishers. Most of the glossary items below have have been compiled from xrefer.com. Use the search form below to find other definitions.

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Bleb

a blister or large vesicle. A filtering bleb is a blister-like cyst underneath the conjunctiva resulting from trabeculectomy, a surgical procedure commonly used in the treatment of glaucoma.

Concise Medical Dictionary, Oxford University Press, Market House Books Ltd 1998
(Source: Xrefer)


Bulla

(plural bullae)
1. a large blister, containing serous fluid.
2. (in anatomy) a rounded bony prominence.
3. a thin-walled air-filled space within the lung, arising congenitally or in emphysema. It may cause trouble by rupturing into the pleural space (see pneumothorax), by adding to the air that does not contribute to gas exchange, and/or by compressing the surrounding lung and making it inefficient. --bullous adj.

Concise Medical Dictionary, Oxford University Press, Market House Books Ltd 1998
(Source: Xrefer)


Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT)

A noninvasive technique for examining soft tissue, most commonly the brain. A narrow X-ray beam is passed through the organ repeatedly (for a full brainscan 180 separate scans are made). A computerized system analyzes the pattern of absorption at each point, which yields the data for full visualization of the organ. In a CAT-scan of the brain one can produce a visual representation of important structures including gray matter, the cerebrospinal fluid-filled cavities, blood vessels and any abnormalities like tumors, lesions, etc. Also called, simply, computerized tomography or CT-scan. See magnetic resonance imaging and position emission tomography.

The Penguin Dictionary of Psychology, Arthur S. Reber 1995
(Source: Xrefer)


Diathermy

The technique of heating parts of the body using high-frequency alternating electric current applied by electrodes. Therapeutic diathermy is used in the treatment of rheumatism and arthritis. In surgical diathermy, one electrode takes the form of a conducting knife or snare, while the current has a coagulating effect and prevents bleeding from small blood vessels.

Oxford Paperback Encyclopedia, Oxford University Press 1998
(Source: Xrefer)


Mediastinum

( pl. mediastina) Anat. a membranous middle septum, esp. between the lungs.

A Dictionary of Science, Oxford University Press
(Source: Xrefer)


Pleural Cavity

the space between the visceral and parietal pleura, which is normally very small as the pleural membranes are in close contact. The introduction of fluid (pleural effusion) or gas separates the pleural surfaces and increases the volume of the pleural space.

Concise Medical Dictionary, Oxford University Press, Market House Books Ltd 1998
(Source: Xrefer)


Pleurectomy

Surgical removal of part of the pleura, which is sometimes done to prevent further recurrences of spontaneous pneumothorax or to remove diseased areas of pleura.

Concise Medical Dictionary, Oxford University Press, Market House Books Ltd 1998
(Source: Xrefer)


Pleurodesis

the artificial production of pleurisy by chemical or mechanical means to obliterate the pleural cavity, in order to prevent recurrent, usually malignant, pleural effusions.

Concise Medical Dictionary, Oxford University Press, Market House Books Ltd 1998
(Source: Xrefer)


Pneumothorax

air in the pleural cavity. Any breach of the lung surface or chest wall allows air to enter the pleural cavity, causing the lung to collapse. The leak can occur without apparent cause, in otherwise healthy people (spontaneous pneumothorax), or result from injuries to the chest (traumatic pneumothorax). In tension pneumothorax a breach in the lung surface acts as a valve, admitting air into the pleural cavity when the patient breathes in but preventing its escape when he breathes out. This air must be let out by surgical incision.

A former treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis - artificial pneumothorax - was the deliberate injection of air into the pleural cavity to collapse the lung and allow the tuberculous areas to heal.

Concise Medical Dictionary, Oxford University Press, Market House Books Ltd 1998

(Source: Xrefer)


Resection

surgical removal of a portion of any part of the body. For example, a section of diseased intestine may be removed and the healthy ends sewn together. A submucous resection is removal of part of the cartilage septum (central division) of the nose that has become deviated, usually by injury. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR or TURP) - an operation performed when the prostate gland becomes enlarged - involves removal of portions of the gland through the urethra using an instrument called a resectoscope.

Concise Medical Dictionary, Oxford University Press, Market House Books Ltd 1998
(Source: Xrefer)


Spontaneous Pneumothorax

See Pneumothorax.


Talc

a soft white powder, consisting of magnesium silicate, used in dusting powders and skin applications. Talc used to dust surgical rubber gloves causes irritation of serous membranes, resulting in adhesions, if not washed off prior to an operation.

Concise Medical Dictionary: Oxford University Press
(Source: Xrefer)


Tension Pneumothorax

Tension pneumothorax can occur without any prior lung conditions or diseases. In most cases, a tension pneumothorax results from the rupture of blebs (air-filled sac on the lung). As a result, air escapes from the lung and enters the chest cavity causing the lung to collapse. It differs from spontaneous pneumothroax in that the collapse is much more severe and can cause many serious medical problems.

As the air escapes from the lung and enters the pleural space, increased pressure can cause a mediastinal shift, in which the heart, trachea, and great vessels are pushed towards the unaffected side of the chest.
(Source: Pneumothorax.org)


Tetracycline

1. one of a group of antibiotic compounds derived from cultures of Streptomyces bacteria. These drugs, which include chlortetracycline, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, and tetracycline, are effective against a wide range of bacterial infections. They are usually given by mouth to treat various conditions, including respiratory-tract infections, syphilis, and acne. Side-effects such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhoea are fairly common. In addition, suppression of normal intestinal bacteria may make the patient susceptible to infection with tetracycline-resistant organisms. Tetracyclines should not be administered after the fourth month of pregnancy and their use should be avoided in young children to prevent unsightly staining of the permanent teeth.

2. a particular antibiotic of the tetracycline group. Trade names: Achromycin, Tetrabid.

Concise Medical Dictionary, Oxford University Press, Market House Books Ltd 1998
(Source: Xrefer)


thoracentesis; thoracocentesis (pleurocentesis) n.

the insertion of a hollow needle into the pleural cavity through the chest wall in order to withdraw fluid, blood, pus, or air.

Concise Medical Dictionary, Oxford University Press, Market House Books Ltd 1998
(Source: Xrefer)


Thoracoscopy

an instrument used to inspect the pleural cavity. --thoracoscopy n.

Concise Medical Dictionary, Oxford University Press, Market House Books Ltd 1998
(Source: Xrefer)


Thoracotomy

surgical opening of the chest cavity to inspect or operate on the heart, lungs, or other structures within.

Concise Medical Dictionary: Oxford University Press
(Source: Xrefer)







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Fact #8

Did you know that spontaneous pneumothorax is often misdiagnosed? (source: "Spontaneous Pneumothorax and its Effects on Aircrews")